Raise the Roof… and Cover it in Red Steel

Matt couldn’t wait to start on the steel roof, and see how the bright red colour looked on Tiny. It did not disappoint! The roof has added a beautiful accent to the home, while also being extremely durable and long-lasting. The steel roof comes in 16 inch panels, designed with a hidden fastener system, so that no screws are exposed. This gives a clean finish, and doesn’t disrupt the aesthetics of the roof, while reducing the possibility of leaking through the screw holes. Because of the small size of the overhangs and the roof in general, a lot of the trim was very tricky to do. On a regular-sized roof, things are more spread out, giving more room to lay out the trim, and more space to work with. But, on Tiny, some of the areas were so small, there were four or five overlapping pieces of trim and flashing. This meant that special attention had to be paid to how these pieces overlapped each other to ensure proper water diversion, even on the highway at 100 km/hour! Overall, it took a lot longer than anticipated, but the results were well-worth it!

Catching Up…

Well, it’s been a long time since we last posted an update on the Tiny House building process, but we have a good excuse: the weather got better in Cape Breton! And this has meant opportunities for longer days working on Tiny outside, and less computer time inside.

But, we have been receiving requests from far and wide (special shout-out to folks in Nunatsiavut, Labrador) to post more updates and photos, so we decided it’s time to sit down at the computer, go through the photo files, and start updating.

Since it’s been so long since the last update, we have decided that for the next 5 days, we will be releasing a new post, with new pictures. This should catch us up… and we promise we’ll be better at this blog posting thing as we go forward.

First up: Windows!

Every house needs windows, and even though this is a tiny home, there are still 17 windows. Most of the windows are smaller-than-average windows, but all are strategically placed to give it as open and spacious a feeling as possible, and to maximize views while not feeling like you’re living in a fish bowl.

Windows are a critical part of the exterior shell, so a lot of care and time went into properly installing them, and making sure that they were water tight. To ensure the windows are 100% water tight, Matt used a special flexible membrane for the window sills. This membrane is a fairly new product that wraps around the window opening as a full stretchy piece, eliminating the need for cuts or joints.

Once the windows were in, Tiny was transformed! The placement of the windows really gave a sense of the interior space, and what the light levels and view points will be.

The Tiny House “Foundation” is Done!

We have some great news here at Howling Dog Construction: the “foundation” (i.e. the custom Trailer) for the Tiny House is done, shipped, and has arrived in Cape Breton!

Ronnie from Kerr Trailers in Quebec was kind enough to send us pictures of the finished project before it shipped, and we are excited to share! It’s now sitting in our driveway, covered in snow, and getting ready for construction to begin.

This tri-axel trailer is 25 feet long, and custom-built to carry up to 18,000lbs. I worked back and forth with the manufacturer over several weeks to make sure we got the specs just right. A strong foundation is essential to building a strong Tiny House, and we are pleased with how this turned out! Can’t wait to start building.

Tiny House on CBC Mainstreet Cape Breton

On Thursday, January 8, 2015, Matthew Willox, Owner/Operator of Howling Dog Construction, joined host Wendy Bergfeldt on CBC’s Mainstreet Cape Breton to discuss the Tiny House movement and designing and building a Tiny Home right here in Cape Breton. Here’s how Wendy introduced the segment.

Since 1973 the size of the average home has grown by 50%, but that trend seems to be reversing. The tiny house movement is about getting less space for a lot less cost. It’s about living more simply and about not having things you don’t really need. This is a great idea if you live in California or Arizona where you don’t have to worry about the winter cold but in Canada is a tiny house a possibility? Some people think it is. Matthew Willox is a contractor who’s building one for a couple right here in the Cape Breton Regional Municipality.

To listen to this great interview, and to learn more about Tiny Homes, click here.